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Clover Leaf Tuna, Salmon & Sardines 'Trace My Catch'!

Seafood Makes a Splash as Delicious & Nutritious!

Seafood Makes a Splash as Delicious & Nutritious!

Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating recommends Canadians eat two food guide servings of fish/seafood each week to take advantage of their many health benefits

SAFETY NET

Wristguards, kneepads and helmets can all be essential protective gear if you’re on wheels!

However, it is estimated that Canadians only get 3-4 servings of seafood per month – less than half of what the Food Guide recommends.1

Are you getting enough?

What’s So Healthy About Seafood?

Top Choice for Essential Omega-3 Fats!

Omegas 3’s have been in the research spotlight a lot lately since they have many health promoting effects.

Omega-3 fats lower the risk of heart disease, stroke, and blood clots. They also reduce blood pressure and cholesterol levels and can prevent macular degeneration, the leading cause of age-related blindness for Canadians. Omega-3 fats are important for brain, eye, and nervous system development of infants as well as for protecting against certain types of cancer. There is also research to support that omega-3 fats may be of benefit for inflammatory conditions such as Crohn’s Disease, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. For more information visit our articles Mega Omega’s! and Good Things Come in Omega-3’s.

Great Source of Protein!

Protein is important for repairing muscles and for a healthy immune system. As part of a meal protein provides fullness, sustained energy, and stabilizes blood sugar. This is why protein is important to help you manage a healthy weight and control healthy blood sugars. For more information on protein visit our article “Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Low in Saturated Fat & Trans Fat

Saturated fat raises LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Trans fats raise LDL cholesterol levels too, but also lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. Therefore it is wise to limit these fats in your diet as much as possible. Fish and seafood are naturally low in saturated fat and most are completely free of trans fat (it occurs naturally in trace amounts in some varieties). Therefore they are heart healthy choices to include regularly as part of a balanced diet.

Rich in Vitamins & Minerals

Seafood is rich in minerals such as phosphorus, iron, selenium, potassium, and calcium. Seafood is also high in vitamins such as thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin which are all necessary for maintaining good health.

Nutrients in Common Seafood2

Helpful Hints:

  • 100g (3.5oz) is the same size as a deck of cards
  • The type of fat naturally found in seafood is heart healthy unsaturated fats that are good for your heart.

 

Seafood

Calories (g)

Protein (g)

Fat (g)

Carbohydrates (g)

½ cup (79g) canned light tuna in water, drained

92

20

1

0

½ cup (79g) canned sockeye salmon (solids, bone, liquid)

129

13

8

0

4 Atlantic sardines (48g) in oil, drained with oil

100

12

5

0

½ fillet (154g) baked or broiled Atlantic salmon

280

39

13

0

½ fillet (159g) baked or broiled Atlantic or Pacific halibut

223

42

5

0

1 fillet (127g) baked or broiled sole

149

31

2

0

1 fillet (62g) baked or broiled trout

118

17

5

0

1 fillet (88g) baked or broiled mackerel

231

21

16

0

1 fillet (124g) baked or broiled pickerel/walleye

148

30

2

0

1 fillet (170g) baked or broiled snapper

218

45

3

0

5 large (60g) boiled or steamed clams

89

15

1

3

125ml (62g) boiled or steamed flaked snow crab

72

15

1

0

125 ml (77g) boiled or steamed diced lobster

75

16

0

1

15 small (53g) boiled or steamed blue mussels

90

12

2

2

5 medium (60g) boiled or steamed oysters

82

8

3

5

3 large (75g) boiled or steamed scallops

72

11

2

2

10 large (55g) boiled or steamed shrimp

54

12

1

0

For more information on the nutrients in other seafood check out: Nutrient Value of Some Common Foods.

Looking for More Information?

Canadian Food Inspection Agency www.inspection.gc.ca

Fisheries and Oceans Canada www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Health Canada www.healthcanada.gc.ca

References

1CMAJ. Clinical nutrition: 4. Omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular care. Mar 5, 2002; 166 (5).

Health Canada. Nutrient Value of Some Common Foods. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/fiche-nutri-data/nutrient_value-valeurs_nutritives-eng.php