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Clover Leaf Tuna, Salmon & Sardines 'Trace My Catch'!

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Powerful Protein!

Protein is an essential necessary part of a healthy diet.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

You can treat waistline and your wallet equally well.

The amount of protein your body needs changes depending on your height, weight, age and activity level.

Nonetheless, while a weight trainer or an endurance athlete may require more protein than a more sedentary person, we all need protein in our diets.

Protein is found abundantly in seafood, meat, poultry, legumes, nuts, eggs, dairy and soy foods.

Our bodies need protein in order to build and maintain muscle mass and for healthy immune function.

Protein in a meal helps to keep you full and sustain your energy longer. Whether you are an athlete, career woman or mom on the run, a healthy well balanced diet including the right amount of protein will determine how successfully you and your family keep up with all of your daily commitments.

How Much is Enough?

The chart below shows Health Canada’s recommended daily protein allowance[1] for healthy Canadians. Using the chart below to calculate your requirements is simple. Multiply your weight in kilograms by the recommended daily allowance from the chart below and you will have your average protein requirements for one day. For example, a 35 year old adult weighing 50kg (110 lbs.) would have a recommended daily allowance of 40g of protein a day (50 x 0.80 = 40). That’s the equivalent of a tuna sandwich for lunch and 3 oz. of lean ground beef at dinner. As you can see, getting the right amount of protein in your diet is very easy!

Recommended Daily Allowance(g/kg/day) [1]

Age Recommended Daily Allowance (g/kg/day)
Infants  
0-6 months 1.52 g
7-12 months 1.20 g
Children  
1-3 years 1.05 g
4-13 years 0.95 g
14-18 years 0.85 g
Adults  
19 + years 0.80 g
Pregnancy (all ages) 1.10 g
Lactation 1.30 g

Canada's Food Guide

To help simplify how much protein you need to eat use the Canada's Food Guide, The Canada's Food Guide suggests that on average, we need 2-3 servings of meat and alternatives per day[2].

One serving of meat and alternatives is equal to:

  • 75g (2.5 oz or ½ cup) cooked fish, shellfish, poultry, lean meat
  • 175ml ¾ cup cooked legumes
  • 150g (175ml or ¾ cup) tofu
  • 2 eggs
  • 30ml (2 tbsp.) peanut or nut butters
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) shelled nuts and seeds

Click here for a copy of the Canada’s Food Guide.

Protein in Foods

To help you understand how much protein is in some of the foods you eat everyday, refer to the chart below[3].

But beware: protein comes with baggage! Protein is only one of the many nutrients in the foods we eat, and it’s important to consider the food choices we make holistically. That’s what makes seafood such an excellent protein choice. Not only is it rich in protein, it is also typically lower in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol than other protein choices. It is also the best and richest natural source of omega-3 fatty acids (click here for more info on omega-3’s). And many seafood choices, such as tuna, salmon and sardines are an excellent source of selenium, an important antioxidant that helps ensure proper cellular function.

Per 75g

Cal 
(kcal)

Protein
(g)

Total
Fat 
(g)

Sat.
Fat 
(g)

Mono-
unsat. Fat 
(g)

Poly-
unsat.
Fat 
(g)

Chol.
(mg)

Se *
(mcg)

Tuna, white in Water, canned

96

17.72

2.23

0.59

0.59

0.83

32

49.3

Tuna, light in water, canned

87

19.13

0.62

0.18

0.12

0.25

23

60.3

Salmon, Sockeye with bones, canned

125

17.50

5.48

1.18

1.52

1.54

33

25.7

Salmon, Pink with bones, canned

102

17.31

3.62

0.64

0.67

1.01

62

29.6

Salmon, fresh, Atlantic, cooked-dry heat

137

19.08

6.10

0.94

2.02

2.44

53

35.1

Sardines, Atlantic, oil + bones, canned

156

18.47

8.59

1.15

2.90

3.86

107

39.5

Herring, Atlantic, Kippered

163

18.44

9.28

2.09

3.83

2.19

62

39.5

Oyster, canned

52

5.30

1.85

0.47

0.19

0.55

41

26.9

Chicken, light meat only, stewed

119

21.66

2.99

0.84

1.01

0.65

58

16.7

Chicken, light meat and skin, stewed

151

19.61

7.48

2.10

2.94

1.59

56

15.9

Beef, lean, all trimmed retail cuts, cooked

196

20.60

11.94

4.70

5.09

0.43

65

15.0

Pork, lean, composite of loin & shoulder blade, trimmed, cooked

176

19.55

10.25

3.53

4.32

1.03

62

31.4

Turkey, meat + skin, cooked, roasted

164

21.07

8.16

2.39

2.66

2.09

59

23.6

Egg, whole, cooked, hard-boiled

116

9.44

7.96

2.45

3.06

1.06

318

23.1

Milk fluid, 2% MF + added Vitamin A

38

2.48

1.48

0.94

0.42

0.05

6

1.9

Soymilk, unfortified, original & vanilla

41

2.45

1.31

0.15

0.30

0.72

0

3.6

* Se - Selenium

Omega-3 Fatty Acids (g)

Per 75g

Total (g)

EPA (g)

DHA (g)

ALA (g)

Tuna, white in Water, canned

0.700

0.175

0.472

0.053

Tuna, light in water, canned

0.204

0.035

0.167

0.002

Salmon, Sockeye with bones, canned

1.145

0.421

0.663

0.062

Salmon, Pink with bones, canned

0.834

0.269

0.520

0.045

Salmon, fresh, Atlantic, cooked-dry heat

1.664

0.308

1.072

0.284

Sardines, Atlantic, oil + bones, canned

1.110

0.355

0.382

0.374

Herring, Atlantic, Kippered

1.718

0.728

0.884

0.106

Oyster, canned

0.357

0.158

0.171

0.028

Chicken, light meat only, stewed

0.053

0.008

0.023

0.023

Chicken, light meat and skin, stewed

0.090

0.008

0.023

0.060

Beef, lean, all trimmed retail cuts, cooked

0.113

0.000

0.000

0.113

Pork, lean, composite of loin & shoulder blade, trimmed, cooked

0.036

0.000

0.000

0.036

Turkey, meat + skin, cooked, roasted

0.128

0.000

0.030

0.098

Egg, whole, cooked, hard-boiled

0.059

0.004

0.029

0.026

Milk fluid, 2% MF + added Vitamin A

0.006

0.000

0.000

0.006

Soymilk, unfortified, original & vanilla

0.056

0.000

0.000

0.056

To look up the protein in more foods, download The Nutrient Value of Common Foods.

For more information on the protein content of Clover Leaf’s products, check out our products in the Products section.

References:

[1]Dietary Reference Intakes. Health Canada http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/reference/table/ref_macronutr_tbl_e.html#29

[2]The Canada Food Guide http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index_e.html

[3]USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/